Two prominent black actors have been seen by some to be among the most conspicuous slights as a reflection of racial prejudice in the film industry. The day after the Oscar nominations, “Till” director Chinonye Chukwu posted on Instagram: “We live in a world and work in industries that are so aggressively committed to defending whiteness and perpetuating blatant misogyny toward black women.”

I asked him about his reaction to that comment about an episode of the «Kermode & Mayo’s Take» podcast posted on Friday, Deadwyler fully agreed with Chukwu.

«We’re talking about people who maybe chose not to see the movie, we’re talking about misogyny, like it comes in any number of ways, either directly or indirectly,» Deadwyler said. “It impacts who we are. I think the question is more about people living in whiteness, whites’ evaluation of the spaces that privilege them.»

Misogynoir, a term coined by black feminist activist and author Moya Bailey, refers to misogyny and bias directed at black women.

“I think the question is more about people living in whiteness, whites’ evaluation of the spaces that privilege them,” Deadwyler added. «We’ve seen it exist in a governmental capacity, it can exist in a societal capacity, whether it’s global or national.»

That Deadwyler and Davis were cut from an Oscar nomination is part of what fueled the initial reaction to the star-studded grassroots campaign for actress Andrea Riseborough. After a series of screenings hosted by celebrities (a regular feature of Hollywood awards season), Riseborough unexpectedly earned a nomination for her performance in the independent drama «To Leslie,» opposite Michelle Yeoh («Everything Everywhere All at Once.» «), Cate Blanchett (“Tár”), Ana de Armas (“Blonde”) and Michelle Williams (“The Fabelmans”).